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26-May-2019 09:00

Once refreshing and highly informative television, Marcus Lemonis' "The Profit" has run its course. But any small business receiving 0,000 as well as Marcus Lemonis' connections should be able to boost revenue. Occasionally, sales bumps on the program are mentioned.Dan, the hardy wine boss who quickly won Lemonis' trust in the original episode, says wine sales on the Internet peaked at ,000-,000 in their best month.

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But as Lemonis spread himself thinner and thinner, the show became a shrine to excess. (See Amazing Grapes and Standard Burger and Inkkas and Wick'ed.) Then there are the quality businesses that got eyebrow-raising investments, such as Mr. 1, Car Cash, might've had the worst investment of all, as the seemingly happy ending of Lemonis' costly overhaul of the Baron brothers' prized location was undermined by an update in which the Barons got booted by their landlord.

A lot of managers act in ways that would never fly at IBM.

Lemonis often picks a select employee to receive equity (with no discussion at all as to whether equity for a low-paid employee who hasn't contributed any capital is a good move for all parties and makes sense from a tax standpoint) but rarely or never suggests raises across the board.

An Amazing Grapes employee who was criticized in the first episode, Brian, vigorously and politely defended his actions in that episode and refreshingly appears to be on solid ground in the update. The amount of time it takes to run a second location or add new product lines is too much for many people.

In the original episode, Lemonis says, "I've spent well over 0,000" on the Amazing Grapes overhaul, which presumably is on top of the 0,000 to take a controlling interest and pay off the vendors. Many episodes of "The Profit" demonstrate that when enabled with money, especially Marcus Lemonis' money, a lot of businesspeople like to splurge.

But as Lemonis spread himself thinner and thinner, the show became a shrine to excess. (See Amazing Grapes and Standard Burger and Inkkas and Wick'ed.) Then there are the quality businesses that got eyebrow-raising investments, such as Mr. 1, Car Cash, might've had the worst investment of all, as the seemingly happy ending of Lemonis' costly overhaul of the Baron brothers' prized location was undermined by an update in which the Barons got booted by their landlord.

A lot of managers act in ways that would never fly at IBM.

Lemonis often picks a select employee to receive equity (with no discussion at all as to whether equity for a low-paid employee who hasn't contributed any capital is a good move for all parties and makes sense from a tax standpoint) but rarely or never suggests raises across the board.

An Amazing Grapes employee who was criticized in the first episode, Brian, vigorously and politely defended his actions in that episode and refreshingly appears to be on solid ground in the update. The amount of time it takes to run a second location or add new product lines is too much for many people.

In the original episode, Lemonis says, "I've spent well over 0,000" on the Amazing Grapes overhaul, which presumably is on top of the 0,000 to take a controlling interest and pay off the vendors. Many episodes of "The Profit" demonstrate that when enabled with money, especially Marcus Lemonis' money, a lot of businesspeople like to splurge.

Some entrepreneurs obviously hit up multiple programs in hopes of finding a taker somewhere.