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American meal times were introduced by Old World settlers and evolved independently accordingly to fit cultural norms. , History Magazine Ancient Greek meal times "Meal times are variable, but a midday meal was usually called ariston lunch... The latter was perhaps typically the biggest meal of the day, and for some the only meal." ---Siren Feasts: A History of Food and Gastronomy in Greece, Andrew Dalby [Routledge: London] 1996 (p.12) British meal times (overview) "In the beginning of the sixteenth century in England, dinner, the main meal of the day, used to begin at AM.69-70) Medieval era "..were the mealtimes and how often did people eat a day?The very poor doubtless ate when they could, but the slightly better-off peasants seem generally to have eaten three times a day.When meals were taken, or even how many meals a day there were, varied according to the calendar, social class, and personal preference.The novice of the Colloquy seems to eat first soon after midday...

There may have been others whose meals were similarly limited from lack of resources, but we do not hear of them." ---A Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food: Processing and Consumption, Ann Hagen [Anglo Saxon Books:1992] (p.

Upper-class people were eating breakfast earlier, and dinner later, than they had formerly done..1808...dinner was now a late meal and supper a snack taken at the very end of the day before people retired to bed.

For a long time luncheon was a very upper-class habit; ordinarily working people dined in the early evening, and contented themselves as they had done for centuries with a mid-day snack...

The time was only specified as a 'convenyent hower', although to break one's fast after devotions was the generally recommended procedure.

Earlier reference to breakfast sometimes meant dinner, literally, in these cases, the first meal of the day.

There may have been others whose meals were similarly limited from lack of resources, but we do not hear of them." ---A Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food: Processing and Consumption, Ann Hagen [Anglo Saxon Books:1992] (p.

Upper-class people were eating breakfast earlier, and dinner later, than they had formerly done..1808...dinner was now a late meal and supper a snack taken at the very end of the day before people retired to bed.

For a long time luncheon was a very upper-class habit; ordinarily working people dined in the early evening, and contented themselves as they had done for centuries with a mid-day snack...

The time was only specified as a 'convenyent hower', although to break one's fast after devotions was the generally recommended procedure.

Earlier reference to breakfast sometimes meant dinner, literally, in these cases, the first meal of the day.

Supper now means a light evening meal that replaces dinner; such a meal is especially popular if people have eaten a heavy lunch..." ---The Rituals of Dinner, Margaret Visser [Penguid: New York] 1991 (p.