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In the Middle Ages, both the river and the town were also known by the German name Laibach.

This name was in official use as an endonym until 1918, and it remains frequent as a German exonym, both in common speech and official use.

These lake-dwelling people lived through hunting, fishing and primitive agriculture.

To get around the marshes, they used dugout canoes made by cutting out the inside of tree trunks.

Some years later, the construction of Ursuline Church of the Holy Trinity started.

Public electric lighting appeared in the city in 1898.

In the 16th century, the population of Ljubljana numbered 5,000, 70% of whom spoke Slovene as their first language, with most of the rest using German.

From 1529, Ljubljana had an active Slovene Protestant community.

The Roman Rite Catholic Diocese of Ljubljana was established in 1461 and the Church of St. Wooden buildings were forbidden after a large fire at New Square in 1524.

The name Laibach, he claimed, was actually a hybrid of German and Slovene and derived from the same personal name. There are several explanations on the origin of the Ljubljana Dragon.

According to a Slavic myth, the slaying of a dragon releases the waters and ensures the fertility of the earth, and it is thought that the myth is tied to the Ljubljana Marshes, the expansive marshy area that periodically threatens Ljubljana with flooding.

Their archeological remains, nowadays in the Municipality of Ig, have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site since June 2011, in the common nomination of six Alpine states.

Later, the area remained a transit point for numerous tribes and peoples, among them the Illyrians, followed by a mixed nation of the Celts and the Illyrians called the Iapydes, and then in the 3rd century BC a Celtic tribe, the Taurisci.

The Roman Rite Catholic Diocese of Ljubljana was established in 1461 and the Church of St. Wooden buildings were forbidden after a large fire at New Square in 1524.

The name Laibach, he claimed, was actually a hybrid of German and Slovene and derived from the same personal name. There are several explanations on the origin of the Ljubljana Dragon.

According to a Slavic myth, the slaying of a dragon releases the waters and ensures the fertility of the earth, and it is thought that the myth is tied to the Ljubljana Marshes, the expansive marshy area that periodically threatens Ljubljana with flooding.

Their archeological remains, nowadays in the Municipality of Ig, have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site since June 2011, in the common nomination of six Alpine states.

Later, the area remained a transit point for numerous tribes and peoples, among them the Illyrians, followed by a mixed nation of the Celts and the Illyrians called the Iapydes, and then in the 3rd century BC a Celtic tribe, the Taurisci.

) The city is alternatively named Lublana in many English language documents.