Chat cell adult meet clues love dating girls

02-Sep-2019 21:10

Conditioning, also known as bone marrow preparation or myeloablation, is treatment with high-dose chemo and/or radiation therapy.

It’s the first step in the transplant process and typically takes a week or two.

Some people also may not be eligible for transplant if they have other major health problems, such as serious heart, lung, liver, or kidney disease.

A mini-transplant, described under “Allogeneic stem cell transplant” in Types of Stem Cell Transplants for Cancer Treatment may be an option for some of these people.

It’s very important to have the support of those close to you.

For example, you’ll need a responsible adult who will be with you to give you medicines, help watch for problems, and stay in touch with your transplant team after you go home.

You’ll want to weigh the pros and cons before you start. They often require being in the hospital, being isolated, and there’s a high risk of side effects.

It’s important for you and your family to know what to expect, because once conditioning treatment begins (see the next section), there’s no going back – there can be serious problems if treatment is stopped at any time during transplant. The steps are much the same, no matter what type of transplant you’re going to have.You will first be evaluated to find out if you are eligible for a transplant. For many people, transplants can mean a cure, but for some people, problems can lead to severe complications or even death.You may have a central venous catheter (CVC) put into a large vein in your chest.This is most often done as outpatient surgery, and usually only local anesthesia is needed (the place where the catheter goes in is made numb).

It’s important for you and your family to know what to expect, because once conditioning treatment begins (see the next section), there’s no going back – there can be serious problems if treatment is stopped at any time during transplant.

The steps are much the same, no matter what type of transplant you’re going to have.

You will first be evaluated to find out if you are eligible for a transplant. For many people, transplants can mean a cure, but for some people, problems can lead to severe complications or even death.

You may have a central venous catheter (CVC) put into a large vein in your chest.

This is most often done as outpatient surgery, and usually only local anesthesia is needed (the place where the catheter goes in is made numb).

The transplant team will be watching you closely for complications, so expect to be at the clinic every day for a few weeks.