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03-May-2019 09:43

In Cuba the tradition is to fix detachable natural (non-artificial) spurs to both legs of the fighting cocks.

Before fixing the detachable spurs, the natural spurs should be trimmed, leaving a trunk not longer than 3 millimeters.

Fights are limited to a single round of 30 minutes, but statistics show that more than 50% of the fights end within the first five minutes.

Persons who are proved to be betting are severely punished by a temporary or permanent expulsion from the tournaments and a prohibition to participate in further matches.

The combatants are strictly paired up to fight according to their body weight.

The allowed difference in weight between the contenders ranks from half to one ounce (14–29 grams) according to the body weight.

In some areas around the world, cockfighting is still practiced as a mainstream event; in some countries it is regulated by law, or forbidden outright.

In Tudor times, the Palace of Westminster had a permanent cockpit, called the Cockpit-in-Court.

The sport was popular in ancient times in India, China, Persia, and other Eastern countries and was introduced into Ancient Greece in the time of Themistocles (c. For a long time the Romans affected to despise this "Greek diversion", but they ended up adopting it so enthusiastically that the agricultural writer Columella (1st century AD) complained that its devotees often spent their whole patrimony in betting at the side of the pit.

Remains of these birds have been found at other Israelite Iron Age sites, when the rooster was used as a fighting bird; they are also pictured on other seals from the period as a symbol of ferocity, such as the late-7th-century BC red jasper seal inscribed "Jehoahaz, son of the king", In some regional variations, the birds are equipped with either metal spurs (called gaffs) or knives, tied to the leg in the area where the bird's natural spur has been partially removed.

A cockspur is a bracelet (often made of leather) with a curved, sharp spike which is attached to the leg of the bird.

In some areas around the world, cockfighting is still practiced as a mainstream event; in some countries it is regulated by law, or forbidden outright.

In Tudor times, the Palace of Westminster had a permanent cockpit, called the Cockpit-in-Court.

The sport was popular in ancient times in India, China, Persia, and other Eastern countries and was introduced into Ancient Greece in the time of Themistocles (c. For a long time the Romans affected to despise this "Greek diversion", but they ended up adopting it so enthusiastically that the agricultural writer Columella (1st century AD) complained that its devotees often spent their whole patrimony in betting at the side of the pit.

Remains of these birds have been found at other Israelite Iron Age sites, when the rooster was used as a fighting bird; they are also pictured on other seals from the period as a symbol of ferocity, such as the late-7th-century BC red jasper seal inscribed "Jehoahaz, son of the king", In some regional variations, the birds are equipped with either metal spurs (called gaffs) or knives, tied to the leg in the area where the bird's natural spur has been partially removed.

A cockspur is a bracelet (often made of leather) with a curved, sharp spike which is attached to the leg of the bird.

There it is mostly fought naked heel and either three rounds of twenty minutes with a gap of again twenty minutes or four rounds of fifteen minutes each and a gap of fifteen minutes between them. It is a seasonal sport, held only during the coolest months of the year (November to April).