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01-Sep-2019 15:48

S-video is a format which splits the chrominance and luminance out onto two separate lines, "C" and "Y," each requiring its own cable; the sync pulses are carried on the luminance line.Why, then, does an s-video cable usually look like just one cable rather than a pair of cables? "Component Video" is an unfortunate sort of name, in that other formats have used this name over the years, leading to some potential for confusion; but today, the expression "component video" ordinarily refers to "Y/Pb/Pr," also known as "YUV," video.Consequently, when one has incompatible source signals and destinations, a cable won't solve the problem.One can't simply wire up a cable with an F-connector at one end and a DVI-D plug at the other and expect to pull digital video out of an antenna.In standard-definition broadcast and analog cable, a composite video signal and accompanying audio are mixed, at the transmitting end, with high-frequency radio waves, and are broadcast through the air or distributed through a cable system.To be viewed on a display, these signals have to be separated from the other channels in the line and converted to unmodulated "baseband" video and audio signals using a television tuner (found in any conventional television set or VCR)."DVI-A" is nothing but RGBHV in a funny connector, and isn't digital at all."DVI-I" isn't really a signal type, but refers, as we'll review later, to a connector type which combines DVI-A and DVI-D.

SDI is serial digital video, run in an unbalanced line unlike DVI, and used primarily in professional production environments.The most common type is RGBHV, with five lines: one for red, one for green, one for blue, one for the horizontal sync and one for the vertical sync.RGBHV is the standard used in VGA and other analog PC computer monitors.DVI-D is a parallel digital standard--a nasty little tangle of wires in a nasty little plug--which consists of up to seven balanced lines (all other common video standards are run unbalanced) carrying the video itself, and five miscellaneous conductors carrying other information.Because this is a digital rather than an analog signal, it can only be converted to another format through a device that is equipped to decode the digital bitstream and render it in analog form.

SDI is serial digital video, run in an unbalanced line unlike DVI, and used primarily in professional production environments.

The most common type is RGBHV, with five lines: one for red, one for green, one for blue, one for the horizontal sync and one for the vertical sync.

RGBHV is the standard used in VGA and other analog PC computer monitors.

DVI-D is a parallel digital standard--a nasty little tangle of wires in a nasty little plug--which consists of up to seven balanced lines (all other common video standards are run unbalanced) carrying the video itself, and five miscellaneous conductors carrying other information.

Because this is a digital rather than an analog signal, it can only be converted to another format through a device that is equipped to decode the digital bitstream and render it in analog form.

But two devices both running Y/Pb/Pr component video, one through BNCs and the other through RCAs, can be hooked together with a cable and will work fine, despite the dissimilarity of connector types.